The Cripples’ Home and Industrial School for Girls, as it was latterly, closed in 1910 or 1911, and Northumberland House became the new home of the Three Arts Club, opened in December 1911. What then comprised the Rose, however, was only the fragment of a much larger building. The interior was recorded by J. P. Emslie shortly before the building’s demolition in 1881. Including 300 infirmary places, this brought total capacity to 1749. 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom and a kitchen are featured in this accommodation. On the east side, Howton carried on under an agreement with Mrs Hinde of 1791. There was a secondary entrance at the north end from the east, on the site of 27 Harley Street, until about 1850. Both halls were in constant demand, successful and profitable, and after the demise of St James’s Hall became the unquestioned centre of London’s orchestral life and the scene of many premières and débuts. It's a nice building with a good layout. Two alleys out of Market Place should also be mentioned: Margaret Court in the north-west angle, leading to Margaret Street and marked Margarets Alley on Rocque’s map; and Market Court on the south side leading to Oxford Street, still today bearing the name shown by Rocque. Travelodge London Marylebone, located just near Hyde Park, features a shared lounge and a bar. A further airing in 1922–3 won a more favourable response but it was not until the 1970s or 80s that the planting of trees was finally accepted by all interested parties. In the ten houses comprising Eccleston’s (otherwise Eagleton’s) Buildings, 129 people occupied the 24 (out of 26) inhabited rooms, which relied on a single cesspit. Girle left Little Conduit Close to his daughter Hannah, wife of Samuel Thayer. Along this southernmost quarter of the street the Berners family owned property on both sides; the Marylebone–St Pancras parish boundary ran in a tapering line behind the houses on the east, but was adjusted in 1900 to bring that frontage into what is now Camden. The conversion, overseen by the architect John Taylor junior, removed some structural columns to allow space for a 45ft-high auditorium, 50ft by 110ft, with a new elliptical timber roof. Marylebone gets its name from a church, called St Mary’s, that was built on the bank of a small stream or bourne called the Tyburn. Could be correct? Harp Close, belonged to the Girle family. 7; James Smithson, founder of the Smithsonian Institute (No. However it was never built. Saville Street frequently appeared in Victorian newspapers as a hotbed of crime, ranging from stabbing, theft and indecent assault to suicide. Suffolk Mews ran in parallel behind the east side up against the boundary of the hospital, with access at both ends, while most of the west side had access to the shorter cul-de-sac Union Mews (Bourlet Close since 1937). Twenty years later this building was remodelled and enlarged, again to Butler’s plans, a temporary station being opened in a new section-house in Aybrook Street. It became known as Paradise Place after the name of a row of cottages. Building on Newlands might have started before, were it not for William Berners junior’s minority. Girle’s small estate was known as Harp or Pond Close – the former name deriving from another inn of Girle’s, built around the corner facing the Tottenham Court Road, the latter perhaps from a nearby reservoir, the other principal development of this period on Girle’s land, which had been established c.1654 beside a natural spring, on the site now occupied by Rathbone Street. Later in the thirteenth century Robert de Vere, 5th Earl of Oxford, who had inherited the manor through his wife, Alice de Sanford, built a manor house half a mile to the north of Tyburn village, on the site where the Conran shop now stands near the top of Marylebone High Street. The Apartments Marylebone, London (United Kingdom) - Deals & Reviews. The ornate iron cage over the entrance was made by Gomme’s Forge, Princes Risborough; the sanitary ware, slightly Art Nouveau in style, by Doulton & Co. Named after Edward Forset (or Forsett), surveyor with the department of works, who owned land here in the 16th – 17th century. But the creation of All Souls Church introduced a fine northward focus for Regent Street and so Langham Place’s bend was put there instead. Two magnificent plane trees which dominate Park Crescent were said to have been planted in 1817 before its construction to commemorate the Allied victory at Waterloo two years earlier. Circle. Neither retains much character. Its owner did not want his situation disturbed. Historically, the important site is the island at the south end, where the lane splits, two inlets into the unremitting current of Oxford Street. Up the new streets, no progress northwards was made. Essentially a hostel with clubrooms, it was visited by the organisation’s patron, Princess Louise, just after completion. But the effect must have been injurious, as in 1732 it was said that ‘the Market did not answer, and is wholly disus’d’. Opposite is a short row, wholly rebuilt since 1890 with a motor garage going in at No. The realignment was eventually carried out in 1898–1900. Stratford and his lessees agreed to arch in the Ay Brook and lay drains to it from the houses at their own expense. Park Crescent thus ushered in the entrance to the Park instead Regent’s Circus hiding it. By the 1790s, the streetscape was complete. When the former workhouse closed in the 1960s its redevelopment for the Regent Street Polytechnic perpetuated the split between mainly institutional buildings on the west side of the street, residential on the other. It was named after another title of the Duke of Manchester and finally connecting James Street to the south of Wigmore Street and Thayer Street to the north of Hinde Street. There may have been some shared use by the parish of St George’s Hanover Square, which until it obtained burial space in Bayswater in 1763 had only the small graveyard off Mount Street, acquired in 1723 when the parish church was being built – if so, perhaps explaining the presence at Paddington Street of the Fitzpatrick mausoleum. Oxford Street formed the southern boundary of the Marylebone estate and was named for its then owner, the Earl of Oxford. The New Road was a result of an Act of Parliament creating London’s first ‘by pass’ in 1756–7. Shortly after that began the systematic rebuilding of Hanson Street with small blocks of flats. Four years later a Mr Bullamore undertook to add a three-storey house over a cistern, and a 12-horse stable. Otherwise the plan protracted existing alignments, as with another east–west line on Cavendish–Harley property, Castle Street, which was driven through from Wells Street to Newman Street as Castle Street East (now Eastcastle Street). In 1747 Huddle took extra ground on the east side of Newman Street just north of Marylebone Passage, but may not have developed it immediately. Building continued southwards for several years, leases being granted to Bayley or at his direction to, among others, Abraham Hearne, bricklayer, Edward I’Anson, carpenter, and Stephen Morris, painter – these three apparently working in consortium. The Cape of Good Hope public house, on the site of No. It was named after the Cavendish Holles estate heiress Lady Henrietta Harley, who was from 1724 Countess of Oxford. This court was built in 1759 between Langham Street and Riding House Street. Nash’s designs and façades for Upper Regent Street gave a Parisian-style uniformity and beauty to the vistas up to All Souls. Along with the exact position of St John’s church, any sense of the size and shape of the churchyard has been lost. When the church became redundant, it was deemed of such value that it was taken down and faithfully rebuilt in the Middlesex suburbs as St Andrew’s, Kingsbury, where its fittings and proportions may still be admired. Building continued as far as the site of the future chapel during 1793–4, partly under a new agreement with William Hunt, a smith.5. PDF 441KB Step-free Tube guide . The Marylebone building, opened by Lady Ossington in March 1883, was modest in comparison but even so a highlight in a drab street. In 1719, it was joined by a new inn called the Blue Posts which was situated where 35 Harley Street now is, on the corner of Queen Anne Street. 15, called Nina Hosali House after the clinic’s founder. She was lying in the corner where she had presumably died; the husband, close to death, was lying in another corner: the jurymen ‘were glad to beat a hasty retreat from the vitiated and poisonous atmosphere’. Princes Street was renamed John Prince’s Street in 1953, after the master builder who prepared the layout plan for the Marylebone estate. As this lay under the intended front walls of 1 and 2 Stratford Place it was cut down below basement level and arched over. Until at least the mid-nineteenth century Thayer Street was more residential and professional than the High Street, where living accommodation was almost all rooms over shops. The plot originally extended further west than in Dickens’s day, covering the sites of two later houses: Church House, later known as Devonshire Lodge, and Church Cottage (respectively 15 and 17 Marylebone Road), both built on an under-lease granted by the then lessee Edward Eyre to the surveyor Thomas Rogers in 1789. Commercial and professional activity was soon established in both Mortimer and Charles Streets, with house furnishers such as Mrs Fisher’s Eider Down Warehouse at the corner of Great Titchfield Street in 1770, and various medical businesses. The houses on the east side of this remnant were replaced in the late nineteenth century by Cavendish Mansions and a studio-house for the painter Lowes Dickinson, adjoining earlier artists’ studios in All Souls Place. Harrowby Street was named after Dudley Ryder, 1st Earl of Harrowby, early 19th century politician, by association with the Cato Street conspiracy at which he would have been killed had it succeeded. The present building on the site, 29 Marylebone Road, dates from 1964 and follows the general look of Methodist Church House adjoining. Portland Road was laid out and in 1757 and became part of Great Portland Street in 1863. 4/5 (65 reviews) See life-size wax sculptures of Hollywood celebrities, historical figures and sporting stars at this famous wax museum in London. The kink to realign the new sections became Langham Place and therefore Regent Street and Portland Place became the same street. Pratt’s map (1708) shows a bowling green behind, while an advertisement of 1774 mentions ‘several good skittle-grounds, commodious harbours, etc’. As well as smoothing the untidiness in the street-pattern in this block where the Cavendish–Harley grid merged with Portland Place and the environs of Foley House, Mansfield Street also had an additional intended function – as a vista or ‘prelude’ to an extravagantly large classical mansion that Robert Adam planned to build on the north side of New Cavendish Street for the Duke of Portland. His Huguenot-centric image of Marylebone village as ‘a quiet spot where one could meet with congenial friends and neighbours’ seems to chime with J. T. Smith’s picture of convivial Sundays at the French Gardens (see below), though Smith suggests a lower-class, cockney rather than affluent or exclusively French milieu. In 1812 Nash and Mayor had increased the diameter of the circus to 724ft, giving some houses frontages of up to 100ft. Regent’s Park Underground station stands next to the park which gives it its name. In the Adams’ original conception, before its incorporation by John Nash in the 1820s into his via triumphalis from Carlton House to Regent’s Park, Portland Place was a rare thing in London – a genuine place. As demand rose the building was enlarged. The National (now Royal National) Orthopaedic Hospital grew out of ‘The Society for the Treatment, at their own homes, of Poor Persons afflicted with Diseases and Distortions of the Spine, Chest, Hip, etc’. Most of the initial development were outbuildings for housing on Marylebone Lane and this thoroughfare has changed much over the centuries. The extension, again largely paid for by Cassel and Iveagh, more than doubled the accommodation and added research facilities. Their former premises, later occupied by the Jesus Centre, include a chapel of 1860 by G. E. Street at the back and the convent building (Nos 82–83) at the front, rebuilt to Ernest Willmott’s design in 1914. 1, giving rise to the Baillie-Hamiltons’ divorce. In accordance with their secondary status in what is now the Howard de Walden street grid, Devonshire, Weymouth and New Cavendish Streets incorporated the entrances to most of the numerous and extensive mews, leaving the grander north–south streets uninterrupted by such lowly turnings. The houses (‘Geneva Row’ on Rocque’s map) occupied plots leased to Brigadier-General William Steuart, nephew of the General Steuart who gave the site for St George’s Church, Hanover Square. Along Grotto Passage was a series of such courts, built over the yards or gardens of houses in Paddington Street and the High Street. A Mrs Nichols who died at the French Gardens in 1766 was said to have lived there for 36 years, and the name (although not appearing in the ratebooks until 1769) was still in general use in the mid 1780s. The Langham Hotel, opened in 1865 on the site of Foley House. A newspaper article stated in September 1721 that the ‘Oxford Market’ was ‘in great forwardness’ – evidence corroborated by the weathervane of the completed market house, which carried the date 1721 and the initials ‘HEH’ for Henrietta and Edward Harley. Its demolition cleared the way for Mortimer Street to go ahead. The Heart Hospital, which occupies most of the east side of Westmoreland Street, is part of University College London Hospital NHS Trust, and houses cardiac services transferred in the early 2000s from the now-demolished Middlesex Hospital in Mortimer Street. Titchfield refers to the Titchfield estate in Hampshire, which came to the Dukes of Portland (from 1716 also Marquesses of Titchfield) through the first duke’s marriage in 1704. Nearby was a street called Harley Street. A five-storey ward block for able-bodied women was built at the south-west corner of the site in 1888. Unified property management in this district collapsed once the Howard de Walden Estate sold off its easternmost holdings piecemeal in 1922–3. The building was designed by Edward Cropper, a Ministry of Works architect responsible for a number of Post Office buildings across the country, and constructed in 1924–6. Problems of access and loading at the West End depots posed what was described after the war as ‘the worst postal accommodation problem in the country’.30 With Sir William Halcrow & Partners as engineers, cut-and-cover works were carried out in 1956–9, altering the alignment of the railway beneath the site, and providing a two-platform station. The process is now complete. With flats came an influx of commercial and professional middle classes. Dividing estates as it did, Marylebone Lane itself was left narrow and winding – qualities now appreciated but which caused congestion and kept its status low until well into the twentieth century. The inhabited nucleus was the top of the High Street, where buildings lined what was still an irregular lane north and south of the church on the west side, but on the east side mostly south of the manor house. At this time most of the east side frontage belonged to the rear grounds of Bingley (later Harcourt) House in Cavendish Square. The hospital was among those that experimented with electrical cures, espoused by some, suspect to others. Welbeck Way is named after Welbeck Abbey in Nottinghamshire, seat of William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland. Only a few local houses, some by James Gibbs, survived into the 1970s and only St Peter’s, Vere Street remains from the earliest period. Completion of its building took place rather slowly only being completed in the late 1770s. In 1862 the Hills opened a girls’ school there, which continued until 1891, following their move to 190 Marylebone Road, where Octavia died in 1912. Great Titchfield Street was used by street traders from about 1850, and by the 1890s food was being sold there from stalls and barrows to a poor population of some 20,000. The prime minister George Canning was born in 1770 at the then No. Very little is known about the origins and development of the house. The backland between Newman Street and Rathbone Street was laid out with several yards and mews, of which only Newman Passage and Perry’s Place off Oxford Street are left. Northbound - Platform 1 . The hospital was planned on axis with the top of Berners Street, yet to be laid out, so doubtless there was a clear line in mind. It was developed in the 1790s and was the ‘best’ street in the immediate neighbourhood. The school, which served 442 girls and infants in 1871, closed in 1908. The new hall became the centrepiece of a diverse music business that by 1914 occupied more than a dozen buildings in Wigmore and Welbeck Streets and Welbeck Way (then Little Welbeck Street). The final circus was to be in the park itself – this was never realised – becoming the Inner Circle. Overlooking Regents Park, the hotel is close to Marylebone. Redevelopment during the nineteenth century and subsequently tended to preserve a relatively low status except at the corners of the more important cross streets. The street north of Devonshire Street was at first to be called Ulster Street and to cross over the New Road into the park, but in the event the Harley Street name prevailed. The resulting building consisted, commonly for urban chapels of its period, of a basement hall devoid of natural light, a galleried auditorium raised above street level and lit from a long lantern down its centre, and living space on two floors over the portico, covering the front of the site. These streets enjoyed some fifty years as fashionable addresses, attracting no dukes or marquesses but a sprinkling of peers and baronets, two bishops, fair numbers of the untitled landed classes and parliamentarians and, above all, the Marylebone staple of high-ranking military men, colonial administrators, East India merchants and investors, upper civil servants, City bankers, placemen, lawyers, doctors and their families. All Souls, Langham Place, built in 1822–4, is one of the showpieces of John Nash’s redesign of this area of the capital, providing a vista up Regent Street where the road needed to curve to the left to line up with Portland Place. Since the early 1960s, with some interior remodelling, it has been occupied by the Oriental Club. That arrangement must have ended by 1843, when the methods for such payments changed. To the north, a narrow strip along the whole west side of Cleveland Street also formed part of the estate, representing an old line of access to the original fields or closes. The parish church of Marylebone, erected to Thomas Hardwick’s designs in 1813–17, with a chancel added by Thomas Harris in 1884–5, is one of the outer landmarks of the West End. William Street was named after Charles Hinde’s brother, was built up from about 1780 by various hands. When the chapel opened in 1775, it was said to have been ‘built’ by order of the Duke of Portland, but it was in fact a speculation by William Franks, who leased the site in 1768 and offered it for sale in 1772 together with the new building. Eventually, in 1907, Great Marylebone Street having earlier been merged into New Cavendish Street, ‘Little’ was able to be dropped. Named after Prince William, Duke of Cumberland, son of King George II. Only the south side retains some of the original small plots, with a few vestigially Georgian houses. For almost exactly the same length of time, from the 1730s to just after the First World War, this site was the administrative centre of the parish, later borough of St Marylebone. Early residents included at least two colonels, a rear-admiral, and Mrs Beilby Thompson, the widowed mother of the politician Beilby Thompson, a society hostess whose house there was reckoned ‘magnificent and charming’ in 1800.94 The geologist and philologist Daniel Sharpe, a brewer’s son, was born in 1806 at No. Facing Portland Place is a bronze statue of the Duke of Kent, Queen Victoria’s father. The George and Dragon at the north end of this terrace, 151 Cleveland Street, is festively stuccoed, an embellishment that may date from alterations in 1861 or 1879. Tyburn church, the first local church of which there is any record, was built about 1200 by the second earl, Aubrey de Vere, at the south end of Marylebone Lane and dedicated to St John the Evangelist. Three fields lying immediately west of Marylebone Lane took their names from the City of London’s conduit, which carried the waters of the Tyburn (or Ay Brook as this stretch of the river was also known) across Oxford Street towards the City. The west end of Wigmore Street was situated where the Portland estate, the Hinde estate and Edwardes estate met and it took a few years before the street (as Edward Street) was extended through this jumble of land ownership. Planned Closure. The music hall was started by John Page, who took over the Rose in 1856, obtaining a music licence that autumn. The National Dental Hospital was established in Great Portland Street in 1861. Development resumed with a row of houses (latterly Nos 16–24) in the early 1830s north of Geneva Row. Marylebone Street, formerly Little Marylebone Street, was mainly built up from 1776 under a building agreement with John Sarson. Rebuilding the Portland Bazaar’s southern half as St George’s Hall left its surviving northern portion ripe for redevelopment. It is, however, the earliest surviving building from the Cavendish–Harley estate and the sole survivor in anything like its original form of Marylebone’s several eighteenth-century proprietary chapels. The widowed Countess of Oxford was little concerned with London affairs. Following the railway station hotel boom of the 1850s, the Langham was a significant novelty in that it was not associated with a London terminus, a severance untried before save at the Westminster Palace Hotel of 1858, near Parliament, which was not a success. They are also the most eccentrically numbered. 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